2015/04/24

"Decoded memories from gene / a eulogy for dad Ken Hara"​



"Decoded memories from gene / a eulogy for dad Ken Hara"​




A film "Asphalt Girl" 1964, third from right



in the dress room 1970



I am writing this text in an apartment room in Tokyo, where my father lived for 40 years. On 5 March 2015, three weeks ago, his life ended at the age of 84 in this very room. On the table right in front of me, there is a picture of my father holding me as if I was something very precious. But I have never lived here. The picture was taken when I was just a few months old and my father saw me first time. My parents neither got married nor live together. Since my birth, I lived alone with my mother and I became an adult without feeling a “strong sense of his absence.” An absence that normally is brought upon by divorce or bereavement in the family. Also I was not interested in whether he is alive or not.

His name was “Ken Hala.” During the post-war era, from the late 1940’s to 1970’s, he was at height of his career as a musical dancer within the Japanese entertainment world. I knew his name and recognized as my father since I could remember, I understood his job as a “dancer” since I came of age and I decided to inherit his “gene” four years ago.
The thing I can recall as being the beginning of everything is that I started dancing before knowing his face and continued it till today. But to be honest, for more than twenty years, his existence didn’t mean anything to me other than “a man whom my mother took me to meet just a couple of times.”

Keeping a reasonable distance from dancing, I entered the Department of Design of Tokyo University of the Arts to learn about stage design when I was 18. However, against my expectation, I came to realize that a field of advertisement and urban design where a “designer” and “art director” play an active roll, looked theatre-like where people and money move towards the same goal. For students of this department, the advertising industry is considered to be one of the possible work place with the brightest future because it is very attractive to work in a creative field while still being connected with the capitalistic society. Managing assignments at university to learn overall design comprehensively, I started thinking that I don’t need to work in a physical theatre. Beyond that, I hardly had a reason to dance anymore.

As a senior art student in Japan, it is common to dedicate all the energy into the final year for the graduate exhibition, which is a grand finale of the student life. Every year, a lot of masterpieces are shown in exhibitions at university and even newspapers as well as Internet media report about them in their papers/sites. Especially for a student in the design department, it will be the last chance to create one’s own “big” work single-mindedly. But I couldn't yet become enthusiastic about “the lonely quest towards tour de force” although the beginning of the fourth year was moving closer. It was because I was somehow desperate for a larger-scaled project happening in real life outside of school. While being in charge of a leading position for several small projects in the school, I was eager to try my planning ability in the real world of the capitalist economy.

If I analyse, this kind of  “carrier-oriented mindset” must have a lot to do with admiration for my mother who raised me by herself. While maintaining the dignity as a human being, she was tough in spirit to go through her life in Japanese society. She was free and beautiful. Like any other ordinary family, my mother and I had many issues and troubles. But we managed them by facing each other. So I believed that I would get properly involved with society and people in the future just like my mother did.

Because I couldn’t resist the urge that emerged naturally out of my circumstances, I ended up deciding to dedicate my last university year into creating something with social value that would involve many people. First, I reserved a large cultural complex in the centre of Tokyo and brought an exhibition proposal to the venue. While I was creating an event from scratch and drowning in the pleasure of having full power of decision, its organization and budget grew bigger and bigger. The stupidity to believe blindly that “if I can make this happen I can change the world” can sometimes become a “pump” to create a big burst of energy. At the time, I was pushing the pump at full throttle and exerted myself whilst causing many people trouble. I was staring at a vision of the exhibition opening on 15 March at ultra-high resolution.

It was 11 March when everything became a delusion and fell apart.

The Great East Japan Earthquake, frequent aftershocks, disruption of transportation and power outage. A situation of the exhibition venue, which is about 180km away from the epicentre, also became far beyond the control of one student taking on all responsibilities by oneself. Despite us finishing equipment carry-in, installation and lighting, and the expectation of the opening in front of us, I had no other choice but to cancel it by exercising my “power of decision.”

One month had passed while I was clearing up an account and sorting out things. Taking a side-glance at the scars of natural disasters that was said to happen every 1000 years, the national flower, cherry blossom, reached full bloom for its life as has happened in the past and partly forcefully brought us spring as a start of a new year. It looked like it had finished its job but now scattered its petals all over the street and covered it up in pure white. Looking at the scenery, which is normally considered as a symbol of the new beginning, I felt it looks exactly like my very dream that had suddenly vanished. Not only my feeling was left behind the seasonal change but also I was hit by the real setbacks some months later. Having shared more precise information about the nuclear accident day by day, it had come to light that dozens of people who worked for the exhibition were “exposed to radiation” while they went to the venue for some preparation. It was simply because I didn’t cancel the event early enough. I bitterly blamed myself. I thought that I couldn’t say ever again that I can take “responsibility” for the situation that would involve other people.


Adding to that, the way the government and mass media dealt with the series of disasters was unacceptable. The truth of concealment and instigation of information were made everyday as if nothing was wrong. The advertising industry that I aspired to be part of was also building an inseparable kingdom with other industries, mass media and the government. I understood very well that if I take part I possibly would have a hand in their system. I realized the peaceful Japan I believed in did not exist in the first place and I was seeing the illusion. My trust to “society”, “public” and “ordinary life” in capitalism as well as the creation engaged in them collapsed into pieces. I was devastated. I didn’t lose my life or family fortunately but I lost my pump to push by getting involved with people and society.


Only time was passing by. As I didn’t go to a part time job my credit card was stopped. My bathroom was out of order but I just left it broken and used shower room in the graduate school. I was not even sure if I was dead or alive. Even in such a situation, one thing left to me faintly yet definitely was my own body that hadn’t given up dancing completely. And there was also the presence of my father that was created by a few memories and imagination I had.
The presence of the dancer, “Ken Hala” and his gene living in my body. I felt like I was saved. Living once again facing myself, I clung to memories of his gene. As a ceremony to say farewell to the broken energy pump, I changed my last name on the family register from mother’s “Kanai” to father’s “Hala.”


“Saori Hala”
It was a spell I cast on myself for not depending on somebody’s value but having courage to live on my own.

The name change procedure at the office was simple. I faced the feeling of disappointment that it was too easy as well as guilt for having done such an outrageous thing without consulting anyone. However, when I received the family register where no name other than me was printed I was convinced that this solitude and freedom would become new source of energy.
Soon after, I wrote a letter to my father and visited him. I told him everything; about taking his last name “Hala”, about using the stage name, “Saori Hala” as a spell over myself and about going to Europe for dance training.
I think I have made quite a selfish move. But, my father was delighted in tears. Like any other person who lived a life only doing what he/she wants, he didn’t look aged even though he was already 80 years old. Like a typical stage person, he had a straight back, youthful face and voice and wide-opened eyes. He looked like a waxwork.
Though I knew my father was a dancer, the reason I was never interested in him was simply because I admired my mother. And my bitterness about him for escaping from his responsibility as a father by following his own dream under the bright light in the theatre business also made me look away from the “gene” that we share. So I feel deeply sorry to my mother for most likely hurting her feeling by my sudden act with a hundred-and-eighty-degree turn.

She must have been deeply hurt by my act but she was still supporting my reckless challenge.

 Four years have passed. In March 2015, I performed a piece “d/a/d” at a theatre in Roppongi, Tokyo. It was co-produced by Fuyuki Yamakawa (Khoomei singer/ artist), Tomomi Oda (musician) and Saori Hala (dancer). Whether it was simply coincidence or inevitability, all of our fathers were used as an important theme in this work.

As I already had planned to move to Germany and enter the Berlin Art University right after the show, I used this occasion as a unique opportunity and invited my father to the performance. For four years since taking his last name, I kept postponing an opportunity to invite him, seeing that I took over the name of Hala without asking, I thought I shouldn’t show him something incomplete. But now it was time and was my way to take responsibility.
It was 28th February, the second day of the three-days show, when he came to the theatre. His situation had changed dramatically since the last time I had seen him. His eyes and voice were still full of life but he was in a wheelchair with an oxygen bottle attached. As the venue had no lift and located in the basement, all of our staff had to carry him with the wheelchair to the downstairs. We somehow managed to take him to an auditorium. Despite our concern about his health, he couldn’t help hiding his excitement about being in a theatre again after such a long time. He was truly adorable. His bright character, which I imagined remained the same when he was dancing on the stage, was easily noticeable to staff who met him for the first time.  
After the performance, the first thing he said was “I can die now!” At that time, we just burst into laughter and shook his hands. We again carried him up to the ground and saw him off until he disappeared into the crowd of Roppongi Street.
 
It was 5 days later when his life came to an end. The whole thing was like a written script.

When I heard of his death, I clearly understood that “I was not too late.” I cried but the tears weren’t because of sadness or shock. I think it is a miracle that people can manage to encounter each other alive in this mortal world. I managed to slip myself into this miracle. Undoubtedly, this brought me and my father the most happy ending.  What I received from “d/a/d” and co-performers was immeasurable. The spirit of “Ken Hala” that I encountered will revive every time I go on stage. Through this work, I understood as the last revelation what “inheriting the genes” means.

I think our life is always destined by some higher power that one cannot reach. Only the spirit that lives throughout our body can sense this power. When I dance my pulse goes faster, then the moment will come when the whole body including toes can feel it. I jump on the floor waiting for the very moment. The strong anxiety to understand this “invisible sense of power”, that came very close to me through my father’s death, will be the reason for me to continue dancing.


25 March 2015
Saori Hala











"d/a/d" 2015


photo by bozzo

『デコードされた血の記憶』亡き父・原健によせて

特に『d/a/d(デーアーデー)』、藝大修了公演(母の回)へお越し下さった皆様へ
突然のお知らせになりますが2015年3月5日、父・原健が永眠致しました。84歳でした。
修了公演のトークに引き続き「生き別れたダンサーの父」を題材のひとつとして扱ったパフォーマンス『d/a/d(デーアーデー)』の終演から4日後のことです。
父の死によせて、私の誕生から26年後のその日に至るまでのことを1ヶ月前に記しました。
先日無事四十九日が終わりましたので公開します。





ミュージカル映画『アスファルトガール』(1964年)より、右から3番目


楽屋にて 1970年


『デコードされた血の記憶』


 私は今、父が40年暮らした都内のマンションでこの文章を書いている。3週間前の201535日、父はこの部屋で84年の生涯を閉じた。目の前の食卓には彼が私を大切そうに抱きしめる写真が飾られているが、私がここで暮らしたことはない。1940年代から1970年代にかけて戦後日本のエンターテイメント文化をミュージカルダンサーとして駆け抜けた父、「原健(はらけん)」。彼の名前を知り父親として認識したのは物心ついてから、彼の「ダンサー」という仕事を理解したのは成人してから、さらにその"遺伝子"を継ぐ決意をしたのは、ほんの4年前のことである。
 

 生まれたときから母親と二人で暮らしてきた私は、離婚や死別によって身内を失うことでもたらされる「強烈な不在」の感覚を体感することも、彼の生死に興味をもつこともないまま成長した。父と母はケッコンもしておらず、私と父の戸籍上の関係は初めから「認知した人」と「非嫡出子」である。ひとつ、今思えばすべての始まりだったとも言えるのは、父親の顔も知らない頃から踊りをはじめ、それをやめずにいたことだが、自分にとって彼の存在は20年以上何の意味もないものだった。おそらく女手ひとつで私を育てた母への憧れが、父の存在をかき消していたのだろう。それに加えて華やかな舞台業界で夢を追いかけるままに、親としての責任から逃れた父への僅かな恨みも、彼と自分の間に共有される「遺伝子」から目を背けさせていた。

 十代の私は、特に出来が良い訳でもなく、かといってグレる度胸もなかった。18歳のとき、踊りとはつかず離れずの距離を保ったまま、ステージデザインを学ぼうと東京の美大のデザイン科に入ったのだが、そこで「デザイナー」「アートディレクター」と呼ばれる人々が活躍する広告や都市設計などの現場を知った。それは、たくさんの人が一つの目的に向かって動く大きな舞台のような世界だった。そうした業界というのは、本科の就職先として考えられる最も華やかな将来のひとつでもある。資本主義社会と繋がりながらも、創造的な仕事ができるということは、とても魅力的に思えた。デザイン全般を広く学ぶ大学のプログラムをこなしていく中で、自分の関わる現場が物理的な劇場であること、まして自身が踊ることの理由は次第に消えていった。

 しかしこれは長年、なんとなくといえど舞台業界へ従事するというイメージをもっていた私にとっては、無謀な進路変更である。そこで私は、同大学の大学院を経由してその出世街道へこぎつけるつもりで、発起人/オーガナイザー/企画者/代表といったものに片っ端から手を出すようになり、あっという間に4年生となってしまった。日本の美大の4年生と言えば、学生生活の集大成としての卒業制作と卒業制作展に全精力をかけるのが普通だ。 そのために美大へ入学する者さえいる。例年、学内展覧会は大作揃いで、それが将来の手がかりになることも珍しくない。満を辞しての「卒業制作」なのだ。しかし私は、そこへの進級を目前に控えたとき、一人の学生として「孤独な大作との戦い」に息巻くことができなかった。学外で起こっている大きなプロジェクトを目で追っては、その規模とリアルなドラマに焦がれていたからだ。今思えば学生の思い上がりではあるが、自分の企画力や行動力を現実の資本主義経済の中で試したくて仕方なかった。

 こうしたいわゆる「キャリア思考」というのもまた、やはり母親の影響が大きかったように思う。1人の人間として尊厳を保ちながら、日本の社会で強く生きる力を持っている彼女は、自由で美しかった。母と私は、他の家族がそうであるように、色々な問題を抱えながらも、11で向き合ってなんとかやってきた。そして今後もその存在を意識しながら、彼女のように社会や人と正しく関わっていくのだと信じていた。

 そんな経緯から自然に生まれた衝動を止めることはできず、学生生活最後の年は、多くの人を巻き込むような、社会的価値のある何かの為に身を捧げようと決意した。まず、都心の文化複合施設を個人で借り切り、そこを舞台にある大きな展覧会の提案を持ち込んだ。出来事をゼロから生み出し、その全ての決定権をもつことの快感に溺れながら、組織と予算をどんどん膨らませていった。「これが成功すれば、世界が変わる」と盲目的に信じる愚かさは、時に爆発的なエネルギーを生むポンプになる。当時の私はそのポンプをフル稼働させて多くの人に迷惑をかけながら奔走し、展覧会のオープニングである3月15日のビジョンを超高解像度で見つめていたのだった。

 しかしそのビジョンがすべて私の妄想として終わったのは、2011311日のことだった。

東日本大震災、それに伴う余震の頻発、交通の混乱、停電。震源から約180km離れた地点にある展示会場の状況もまた、一人の学生が安全の責任をとれる範囲をゆうに超えていた。オープンを目前に控え、搬入、設置、ライティングまで完了していたにも関わらず、私は自らの「決定権」を行使して展覧会を中止せざるを得なかった。

 その年は卒業式も入学式また同じく中止となった。漫然と始まった大学院の初ゼミ。その帰りに眺めた谷中霊園の道路が、散った桜で真っ白だったことを覚えている。何もしたくない、と思った。展覧会の清算や諸々の片付けを機械的に処理する以外は本当に何もしなかった。バイトへも行かなかったのでクレジットカードが止まり、自宅の風呂が壊れてもそのまま大学のシャワーを使っていた。何もしたくないけど、生きていかなければならない。生きていかなければならないということは、何かをつくらなければならない。そのループは素数のように、自分にとってそれ以上の分解が不可能であることも知った。その回転の中で自分は止まっているのに、世の中も時間も勝手に進んでいく。唯一、モラトリアムな状態に靄をかけてくれていた展覧会の後処理も徐々に晴れていった。
 関係者以外誰にも見られることなく終わった美しい空間。私はせめてものオトシマエとして、展覧会をウェブ上で開催することにした。デザイン科の先輩に頼み込み、大量のスチール写真からストリートビューのようなシステムを組んでもらい、その公開を一つの節目とした。
 こうして私の学部生活は終わりを迎え、私は震災のショックとともに大きな挫折感を味わうこととなったのだが、本当の挫折はその後に訪れた。

 日に日に原発事故の情報が拡散されて行く中で、自分の中止の判断の遅れのせいで数十人の関係者が屋外へ外出し「被爆」というものをさせられていたことが明らかになったのである。それは多くの人を巻き込みながら責任を背負うことの何たるかを知るには十分過ぎる事実であった。自分を激しく責めた。もう二度と、人を巻き込んで「責任」ということばなど口には出来ないと思った。

 それに加え、これら一連の惨事に対する政府・マスメディアの対応は酷いもので、真実の隠蔽や情報の扇動が連日当たり前のように行われていた。自分の憧れた業界もまた、産業界、マスメディア、政府と不可分な帝国を築いており、そこに携わることはそうした体制に加担する可能性があるということがよく分かった。私の信じていた平和な日本というものは始めから存在せず、幻想を見せられていたのだ。資本主義における「社会」「公共」「日常」、そしてそれらに従事する表現への信頼はガラガラと崩れていった。私は震災によって命や家を失うことこそなかったが、人や社会との関わりの中で稼働させていたエネルギーのポンプは壊れてしまった。相変わらず、頭は真っ白なまま、時間だけが過ぎていった。

 そんな心許ない世界に、ぽつんと、しかし確かに残されていたのは、踊りを辞めなかった私の身体ひとつと、僅かな記憶と想像でつくられた父親の存在だった。ダンサー「原健」と、私の身体に流れる彼の血。救われる気がした。私は生きて自分と向き合うためにこの血の記憶にすがり、枯れたポンプとの決別の儀式として、自らの戸籍上の姓を母の「金井」から、父の「原」へと変更した。


 『原 沙織(ハラ サオリ)』

展覧会の企画書に何度も書いた「社会的」「文化的」「革新的」といった言葉を楯にしたエゴを捨てて、自分のために1人で生きる勇気を持てるよう、自分で自分にかけた呪文である。

 役所での手続きは簡単なもので、母の籍から父の籍へ移り、そこから籍を独立させることで公的な関係を崩すことなく姓を変更することが出来た。まず非嫡出子でも成人していれば自分の意志だけで戸籍の操作が可能ということに驚く。そして誰にも相談せずにとんでもないことを完了させてしまった後ろめたさを抱えながらも、自分以外の誰の名前も記されていない戸籍謄本を手にしたとき、この孤独が、この自由が、私の新たなエネルギーになるのだと確信した。
 早速、父へ手紙を書き、家を訪ね、すべてを事後報告した。ダンサーとして「原」の姓をもらったこと、作家名『ハラサオリ』という呪文を自らに重ねてかけたこと、そしてこれから渡欧して、ダンスの訓練を始めること。

 随分身勝手なことをしたと思う。しかし父は涙を流して喜んでいた。好きなことだけをして生きてきた人間が皆そうであるように、その時父は既に80歳だったにも関わらず、まったく年齢を感じさせなかった。舞台人らしく伸びた背筋、張りのある顔と声、かっぴらいた眼。蝋人形のようだと思った。

 母親は、私の手のひらを返したような行動によって大きく傷付いたに違いないが、それでも私の無謀な挑戦を止めずにいてくれた。

 「両親」に宣言した通り、その後単身ドイツへ渡り、「金井沙織」が誰か、「芸大」が何か、「東京」がどんな場所かも、誰も知らない世界で「ダンサー・ハラサオリ」という人物をゼロから創り始めた。そして2014年春に帰国。東京での制作・発表を重ね、名実共に「彼女」のアウトラインができはじめ、2015年度末には修了制作「W1847mm×D10899mm×H2812mmのための振付」を発表し、無事に学位まで与えられた。私の妄想から生まれた架空の人間が、戸籍の変更を皮切りに着々と社会的権利を獲得し実体化していったこの一連の滑稽な出来事こそが、私の修士課程における作品であると言えるだろう。


 そして今から約1ヶ月前の20152月、西麻布の劇場にてパフォーマンス公演『d/a/d(デーアーデー)』を発表した。山川冬樹(ホーメイ歌手・美術家)、小田朋美(音楽家)、ハラサオリ(ダンサー)による共作である。様々な偶然が重なってか、あるいはそれも必然だったのか、私の父をはじめ3人それぞれの父親が、作品の中で重要な題材の一つとして扱われることになった。
 その時既に、4月から再びドイツへ移住することが決まっており、しばらく国内公演はできないだろうと思ったので、またとない機会として私は父を招待した。彼の姓を継いでから足掛け4年、勝手に継いだ以上は半端なものは見せたくないともったいつけては先延ばしにしていた私のケジメだった。


 父が公演を観に来場したのは228日のマチネ、数年前と状況は変わり彼は酸素ボンベを積んだ車椅子での生活を送っていた。相変わらず眼や声はハツラツとしていたものの、劇場はエレベーターのない地下一階にあったため、当日はスタッフ総出で彼を車椅子に乗せたまま担いで階段を降ろし、なんとか客席へ。周囲の心配をよそに久々の劇場に興奮を抑えられずにはしゃぐ父の姿が心からいとおしかった。ダンサーとしてステージで輝いたままの騒がしく華やかな人柄は、その日初めて父と会った関係者にも十分に伝わっていただろう。
 終演後、父が最初に放った言葉は「もう俺、死んでも良いッ!」だった。そのときはただ皆で大笑いして、手を握って、帰りはまた地上の通りまで皆で彼を担いで上がり、六本木通りの雑踏の中へその姿が消えて見えなくなるまで見送った。
 
 父が永眠したのは、その5日後だった。
 訃報を受けた瞬間、はっきりと「私は間に合ったのだ」と思い、悲しみやショックとは少し別の涙が流れた。人と人とが現世で生きて会えることは奇跡である。その奇跡に私は滑り込んだ。このことは間違いなく、父と私にとって最も幸せな最期をもたらしたと信じている。
 『d/a/d(デーアーデー)』という作品から、そして共に舞台に立った共演者から与えられたものは計り知れない。三人が他の二人のために身を捧げ、永遠に回転し続ける美しいトライアングルの中でいくつもの奇跡が起こり、突然の父の死もまたそのうちの一つであった。
 私の向き合ったダンサー「原健」の魂は、これから私が舞台に立つ度に必ず時を超えて蘇る。私は「血を引き継ぐ」ということの本当の意味を、この作品からの最後の啓示として受け取った。



 私たちは常に、個人の思惑の届かないところにある大きな力によって揺り動かされているように思う。そしてこの身体を巡り、脈打つ血だけがその大きさを知っている。私が踊れば心拍数は跳ね上がり、足の指ですらその揺らぎをつかめる瞬間が訪れる。その一瞬を求めて私は地面を蹴るのだ。父の死を介して届きかけたあの「何か」に再び触れんとする全身の渇望は、生涯、私が踊り続ける理由になるだろう。


2015325




原沙織







「d/a/d(デーアーデー)」2015年

©bozzo